Medieval Bunnies

Perhaps not so cute and fluffy medieval bunnies for your Easter viewing enjoyment!

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La Somme le Roy, France circa 1290-1300

British Library, Add. 28162

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Verdun, Bibliotheque municipale, MS 107

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British Library, Royal 10 E IV

‘The Smithfield Decretals’ (Decretals of Gregory IX with glossa ordinaria), Tolouse ca. 1300, illuminations added in London circa 1340.

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British Library’s MS royal 10 E IV

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British Library’s MS royal 10 E IV

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Verdun, Bibliothèque municipale, MS 107

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Cambridge, Fitzwilliam Museum, 298

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British Library’s MS royal 10 E IV

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Bibliotheque de la Sorbonne MS 121

*The rabbit was considered a highly destructive animal during the Middle Ages, but prized for its fur and meat. Unlike the hare, the rabbit was far more rare because it was not indigenous to Britain, and was imported from France during the 13th century. However, even though it was no rarity in France, its depiction in artwork emphasizes its teetering role between pest and prized commodity (important enough to be portrayed, but usually not in a favorable light). The pictures from manuscripts above were mainly created in France, regardless of where they are housed today.

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